Cuneiform writing and translation

Cuneiform clay tablet translated for the first time March 31, A cuneiform clay tablet that has puzzled scholars for over years has been translated for the first time. The conclusion drawn by research in the middle 20th century was that it must be due to a very large meteor impact because of the evidence of crushing pressures and explosions. But this view lost favour as a much better understanding of impact sites developed in the late 20th century. However, the evidence that puzzled the earlier researchers remains unexplained by the view that it is just another landslide.

Cuneiform writing and translation

Many languages throughout a vast geographical span over thousands of years were written in cuneiform, including Sumerian, Hittite, Hurrian and Akkadian. Cuneiform was used to preserve the official royal correspondences between leaders of empires, but also simple transactions and record-keeping that were part of daily life.

Over time, the skill of writing moved outside the main institutions of cities, such as temples and scribal schools, into the hands of citizens, as well as into private homes. Despite its dominance in antiquity, the use of cuneiform ceased entirely at some point between the first and third centuries AD.

The great empires of the Ancient Near East experienced a long decline over many centuries, which ultimately resulted in the loss of Egyptian hieroglyphs and cuneiform as written languages. The disappearance of cuneiform accompanied, and likely facilitated, the loss of Mesopotamian cultural traditions from the ancient and modern worlds.

There are several schools of thought surrounding the disappearance of cuneiform, including competition cuneiform writing and translation alphabetic languages where letters correspond to sounds such as Aramaic and Greek, and the decline of writing traditions.

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However, the process of the transition from cuneiform to alphabet is yet to be clearly understood. In the 15th century, cuneiform inscriptions were observed in Persepolis in modern-day Iran.

Hyde viewed the cuneiform markings as decorative rather than conveying language — a widely held view in academic circles of the 18th century. Yet cuneiform remained cryptic, and its ancient masterpieces buried and inscrutable. The modern-day decipherment of cuneiform owes a great debt to the rulers of the Persian Achaemenid dynastywho reigned in what is modern-day Iran in the first millennium BCE.

These rulers made cuneiform inscriptions recording their achievements. The most important of these inscriptions for the decipherment of cuneiform was the Behistun inscription, which recorded the same message in three languages: Persian, Elamite and Akkadian.

This trilingual inscription was carved into the face of a cliff in Behistun in what is now western Iran. Sip Like a Sumerian: InHenry Creswicke Rawlinson was training troops of the Shah of Iran when he encountered the inscription.

In order to reach the writings and transcribe them, Rawlinson needed to dangle from the cliffsor to stand on the very top rung of a long ladder.

From these precarious positions, he copied as much of the inscription as possible. The boy was said to have used pegs dug into the rock wall as anchors to swing across the cliffs and reach the most inaccessible parts of the writing.

cuneiform writing and translation

Returning home, Rawlinson began working to unlock the secret of the lost script, perhaps with his pet lion cub by his side. Of the three languages, the Old Persian was the first to be decoded by Rawlinson.

Scholars working on deciphering the script gained a sense of the chronological placement of the inscription and recognized some repeated signs, thereby gleaning something of the content and structure of the writings.

Other Greek historians, and the Bible, were also consulted in the process. Through the contributions of a number of scholars in the first half of the 19th century, cuneiform slowly began to reveal its secrets.

The Behistun inscription in western Iran was key to unlocking cuneiform — and the intellectual riches inside it. In recent years, the inscription has been the focus of restorative efforts, after sustaining various types of damage — notably when Allied troops used the inscription for target practice during World War II.

Cuneiform Controversy As the deciphering went on, divisions developed in the academic community over whether efforts to unravel cuneiform had proven successful.The Behistun Inscription, caninariojana.com article by Jona Lendering, including Persian text (in cuneiform and transliteration), King and Thompson's English translation, and .

Cuneiform script is one of the earliest systems of writing, distinguished by its wedge-shaped marks on clay tablets, made by means of a blunt reed for a stylus. The name cuneiform itself simply means "wedge shaped", from the Latin cuneus "wedge" and forma "shape," and came into English usage probably from Old French cunéiforme.

Write Like a Babylonian. See your monogram in Cuneiform, the way an ancient Babylonian might have written it. Cuneiform: The earliest standardized writing system, a form of writing on wet clay tablets using a wedge-like writing tool called a stylus.

Free Online English to Babylonian Cuneiform ~ See your Words as written in the Babylonian Cuneiform Alphabet ~ Enter up to characters (about 30 words) or numbers.

Notable features

Cuneiform script is one of the earliest systems of writing, distinguished by its wedge-shaped marks on clay tablets, made by means of a blunt reed for a stylus.

The name cuneiform itself simply means "wedge shaped", from the Latin cuneus "wedge" and forma "shape," and came into English usage probably from Old French cunéiforme. The Cuneiform Writing System in Ancient Mesopotamia: Emergence and Evolution. The earliest writing systems evolved independently and at roughly the same time in Egypt and Mesopotamia, but current scholarship suggests that Mesopotamia’s writing appeared first.

Cuneiform clay tablet translated for the first time